Memory Loss

It’s inevitable . Don’t count yourself out. No one wins in this battle. 

She called me and voiced her concern. I said, “what’s the matter?”

“He asked me again how old I am.” Repeat.  Rewind.  Move forward.  It was the advice I gave. 


“Keep drinking your nightly glass of wine too!” That advice she liked. A lot . 

Memory issues are ever present in my own devised, messy life. As a brain tumor survivor,  I decided to do life as my will determines it to be. That can be complicated as well as simple. Never boring. 

Then there is my autistic son . He has real issues remembering everyday life sequences. I try to make life fun for him. It really helps. 

The problem I see with care takers is the isolation brought on by the inability to be out in society as much. My idea is we all need to help each other.  Forgiving those that are losing their memory also is probably not what a care provider or family member wants to hear, but it’s the only way one can be. 

For example, Caring for my son was days without sleep turning into countless years with sleep deprivation. My son turns 24 next week, 22 years I was the main provider. I had several helpers throughout the years and his dad was awesome, but most weighed heavy on my shoulders. 

Routine also needs to be kept constant. I did not realize it until my son was born. I am mostly a spontaneous person and do not care for everything being the same day in and day out.  Spontaneity was needed because my RN job caused me to have to document everything very closely by the clock. I sure did not want to do that with my personal life! 

Written in memory of those who lost their battle with dementia. 

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10 thoughts on “Memory Loss

  1. Carl D'Agostino

    The D word. I fear it. When advanced who can afford $10,000 + a month for facility for aged? And that’s a cheap place, understaffed, low skill and uncaring personnel and roach and rat feces in the food. My daughter drug addict so no help there and wonder what my son could do for me. Not much I suppose. Assisted suicide seems more and more sensible to me.

    Reply
  2. Glory's Mom

    Alesia, You are an amazing person! I love how you love! Thank You for writing this encouraging word! Bless you, my friend!

    Reply
  3. kkessler833

    Memory loss is awful. My Dad never lost any of his long term memory but his short term memory was so bad towards the end of his life that he asked the same thing over and over again. I just pretended it was the first time, but it does wear you down.

    Reply

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